About your Search

20121027
20121104
STATION
WHUT (Howard University Television) 22
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English 22
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
improve schools. his goal of providing a free world-class education to anyone, anywhere, is ambitious, to be sure. his success has landed him on the top 100 list can receive approval from the gates foundation. our conversation with salman khan, coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: if you think they are not any big ideas out there, salman khan is a man with a big idea. he founded the free nonprofit khan academy to provide free education to anyone, anywhere. he has delivered more than 45 million lessons today. salman khan, good to have you on this program today. when you say the one world schoolhouse, what do you mean by that? >> it was intentionally in chosen to be in
an education series last year called "too important to fail." i did a prime-time special last year. i am working on one now. this one is called "education under arrest." it is the -- about the criminalization of our kids in education, and where we would have been sent to the principal's office years ago, now you literally get a criminal record. you are standing in front of a judge for a fight in school, an argument with the teacher. the basic stuff that we used to get in trouble for and go to the office or go sit in study hall for a couple of hours, these kids are getting records, under this zero tolerance policy. i have been talking to a lot of kids in filming the special who are in alternative schools. the kids i have been talking to cannot cut it in the schools they are in, the traditional schools, or they want something different or court, in an alternative program. i read that at one point in your life, not because you were in trouble -- at one point in your life, there was a decision by made by your parents or somebody to put you in an alternative school. i want to be clear, not be
the biggest star they have the right now. he is a very smart guy. he is highly educated and very different from a lot of other latino politicians. he is completely american in his point of view. i think it will pass over more than a lot of other candidates. >> give me your sense of how important beyond this election this voting bloc will become. >> just democracy itself, that means the percentage of overall vote and will be hispanic will continue to grow. how will it break? i do not think it is a democrat did block. i think it is an independent bloc. i think it is winnable for both parties. i do not think immigration we will be talking about in five or 10 years. i think the party that ignores some of these basic issues, education reform is really a major civil rights issue right now. 80% of the students in los angeles public schools are hispanic, so when that system sales, los angeles fails, california fails, but latinos feel this as well. tavis: how important is it to have voices in mainstream media that get a chance to express this view? >> one would be nice. i am struggling. when you lo
passion to muse musical education and ask me today around the world musical education is getting -- disappears. >> rose: why is that? >> i think one is economy, prices, and people think let's be more practical, maybe music and art is not really necessary so when they look into the budget when they see music and art they say oh, we can cut that. so this worries me a lot because i don't -- >> rose: because of what culture means to you and what it does for the soul and the psyche. >> it makes our minds in a much more creative way and makes our heart more peaceful. >> is it -- what's the level of appreciation in music in china versus the united states or elsewhere? >> china is a very different situation. chinese kids are crazy about learning musical instruments and in a moment we are -- we have like 90 million people learn instruments. and half of them are playing piano. so every elementary school that i see has a music class so for the future i see there's a huge passion for music. >> rose: why do they want the piano? >> i don't know. maybe piano is simple to play? (laughs) >> rose:
. the international contest, jut standing educational media programs. 60 countries and territories made more than 330 entries to the contest, sponsored by nhk. japan's crown prince attended the award ceremony at the nhk broadcasting center in tokyo. it went to the spanish film. the movie depicts how two men deal with effects of aging. judges cited detail and humorous description of the issue of nursing care. >>> they awarded the best work prin mar in primary, to my classroom. and the best work in innovative media went to the alzheimers experience by the dutch production company submarine. >>> time now to check the world weather forecast, people in the caribbean island are dealing with a very strong storm. let's tornado now to meteorologist, sayaka mori for updates. >> wreaking havoc in the caribbean island. we have some video coming out of cuba. after battering jamaica, the hurricane sandy slammed into cuba thursday as category 2 system. strong wind have toppled trees and downed power lines. also extensive mudslides and flooding occurred, forcing hundreds to seek shelter. now sunday is situated over
to the foreign drug -- attractions to the foreign drug companies. there are educated, english-speaking doctors, and a vast population from which to choose trial subjects, all of whom are required under indian law to give their informed consent. >> i put my thumbprint on the document and my daughter-in-law signed in hindi, but the form was in english, so we couldn't understand everything. >> but that was enough for a 3-day-old healthy boy to be given a trial polio vaccine. he had a severe adverse event which was recorded by the hospital. four days later his family says he still has breathing and eating problems. this baby is more than one of 80 patients who the records show was severely affected in the trials in this town, most of which took place here at the main hospital. the families of the dozens who died might have never known their loved ones were ever on a trial, were it not for a doctor here at the hospital who turned whistleblower. >> the clinical trial subjects don't know the meaning of clinical trials. these doctors, they are making money and they are making huge amounts from the pha
as a speechwriter for then vice president walter mondale and a colleague of the late u.s. commissioner of education ernest boyer. welcome to you both. >> thank you. >> thank you. >> kathleen, the last time you were here you said all we've got left in the search for truth and knowledge is the debate. all right, are you satisfied now? >> no, we did not get an answer to the question that i wanted answered, which is "what are the sacrifices you're going to ask of us? where are you going to get the money that we need in a way that won't tank the economy, that will increase the likelihood of economic growth?" and so, the problem now facing the country and the candidates is we're going to elect a candidate who is going to govern by asking us to make choices that we haven't anticipated. and as a result, we're going to feel betrayed to some extent, even if we voted for that candidate. >> the debates were the most watched in a long time. your field intersects politics and entertainment. do you think entertainment values had something to do with this? >> well, i think suspense was what was required down to th
're trying to see. >> do you recruit? >> i've been very involved in medical student education for years. at least indirectly i hope i have been recruiting in psychiatry for a long period of time. >> do you have more to say on why there aren't more recruits? have you thought of going into sigh kapsychiatry yourself? >> no, no. >> where does freud stand today? >> freud is unfashionable. a lot of what he contributed was enormously useful and continues to be. >> i declared him to be the of e century. >> he was an astonishingly original thinker. >> do you have comments on the safety aspects of drug taking? >> i want to point out that the conditions that these drugs eliminate or help with are more dangerous than the drugs. anxiety is really bad for your body. sleeplessness is very bad for your mental and physical health, so these drugs, if they're helping you with these conditions, you're doing yourself a favor. ssri's are non-addictive and you can't overdais. they're fairly safe. >> you prescribe these drugs, right? >> yes. >> you see the addictions, do you not? >> it is something that we ca
have worst turn out records by virtue of income and education. no matter what the election if they want to win. >> i want to consider -- they talk in terms -- we talked about this before the taping but they talk in terms of the ground game with democrats of this point, more offices, more personnel just having much -- >> like the -- >> republicans are spending their money on tv ads and democrats are spending on the ground game which democrats have decided this election is more important. i wonder if the republicans need as big a ground game because they have the churches. they have the pastors at the mega churches all over this country telling their parishioners, their members to go out and vote republican. >> churches are both democrat and republican. >> because they're working their butts off on ground. >> but i would say this for obama he's been campaigning for a year and a half. romney had very tumultuous primary, the president still can't move the needle. we talk about gender gap the enthusiasm gap, more youth, more women, more minorities are not coming out for the president as they
. they have a lot of things to worry about. but they need to educate themselveses on this issue because it's not getting fixed. the tragedy of this prior to the crisis, there are a few simple things that could have been done that could have prevented this. we should have raised bank capital requirements, constrained the amount of large financial institutions to use borrowed money to fund themselves. instead regulators were allowing financial institutions to take on more leverege. >> rose: what about glass-steagle. >> the glass-steagle issue is now an issue because of the bailouts and all the consolidation. it wasn't so much a driver of the crisis but it's an issue now. i think this is a real problem and i see insured deposits funding more and more, really high-risk activity, and that high-risk activity may have economic worth but i don't want the government funding it with insured deposits. >> rose: you want insured deposits only for banks it involved in traditional-- >> lending, derivatives, security tradings, market making should be out of banks-- take deposits, make loans. >> rose: can
and education and entertainment is going to come from the e space. and i am very, very encouraged. >> but here t goes back to your question, charlie about "newsweek". and it goes back to the question of newspapers. and it goes to the question of books. you always are going to have an economic issue. and the economic issue is how do you support things that are important. >> rose: thank you, thank you, tim, thank you, jane, thank you for joining us. see you nextime. captioning sponsored by rose communications captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org i'm laura linney, and this is masterpiece classic. nurse: lady agnes! i'm going home to eaton place. i'm beryl, the new nursery maid. miss buck is in hospital. i am running the household.
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)